Corporations Killed the Radio Star

The Chicago Tribune has an article which discusses Infinity Broadcasting’s decision to ditch traditional programming in an attempt to lure listeners away from iPods and satellite radio.

The plan to ditch all programming is the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard. Instead of actually attempting to combat satellite radio and iPods, terrestrial radio has instead opted to try whatever gimmicky idea that sounds good in a sound bite: “today’s music…and whatever we want” (the sad part is I didn’t make that tagline up). What will happen now is the three or four actual songs they play in a thirty minute period, that is, whatever music they can fit around the commercials, will all be from different time periods and genres. Great. That means it could be hours before I hear a song I like.

The problem with terrestrial radio is that there are waaaaaaayyyyy too many commercials. You can listen for an hour to a station and be lucky to hear six songs. They DJ’s also talk too much. They seem to think they’re some kind of celebrities. JUST SPIN THE DAMN CD’S YOU MORONS! I don’t give a crap about whatever wacky stunt the morning crew has decided to pull on the local television station. I want to hear some music to take my mind off of the clusterfu$% that traffic in the U.S. has become.

All the radio shows follow the same formula: One male DJ that is opinionated and has a short temper. One male DJ that is just WACKY! A female newsperson/weatherperson/trafficperson that is there to “reign in” those adolescent males. Oh those crazy guys! And one or more interns/producers/station managers the male DJ’s can yell at.

I highly recommend getting an iPod with the car adaptor, or subscribing to satellite radio. We have XM and have been very happy with it. All the music stations are commercial free. The other stations that do have commercials only play them every hour or so, and the commercials are very short.

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